Toronto Field Naturalists  –  Enjoy and preserve nature with us!
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The Toronto Field Naturalists have been promoting a love of nature in Toronto since 1923. Learn more about us, what we're doing and how you can volunteer.
March Photo Spotlight
Pearly Wood Nymph Larva
Pearly Wood Nymph Larva by Ken Sproule
Thank You!
The TFN board appreciates the time and effort our members took to fill in our Membership Survey! We are examining the results now to see what we can do to make the TFN a stronger organization and to make sure we are meeting our member's needs. Thank You to all who participated!
2015-2016 Grants
We are accepting requests for funding. To apply for a grant, please fill out Section A of the Funding Request form and return it to the TFN before March 27, 2015.
TFN Endorse NoJetsTO
The Toronto Field Naturalists, a charitable organization of people who love and want to protect our natural environment, endorse the mission of NoJetsTO because of our concern with the impact of the expansion on wildlife that lives and breeds along the waterfront. Read the full statement here.
Young Ornithologists' Workshop
The Long Point Bird Observatory is looking for keen teen birders (ages 13-17) to apply for the 2015 Doug Tarry Natural History Fund - Young Ornithologist Workshop to be held from Aug 1-9, 2015. Participants will receive hands-on training in field ornithology including bird banding, field identification, preparing museum specimens, and more! Applications are due April 30, 2015. More information here.

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Reporting Bird Collisions
Now you can easily report bird collisions. FLAP (Fatal Light Awareness Program) has introduced a new online tool where people can record the location and time of bird-building strikes. The goal of this interactive map is to create a global collision database by using the power of the Internet to reach out to millions of potential data collectors instead of having to only rely on a limited set of volunteers. Another benefit of the new tool is that people can record collisions at residential buildings, which FLAP currently cannot survey, and which cumulatively account for the majority of bird deaths. The tool can be found at flap.org.
The Trees for Schools 2015
The Trees for Schools program encourages elementary students in southern Ontario to plant trees in celebration of Earth Day and as a way of making a positive contribution to the environment. Planting trees helps students connect with nature. This program was launched in 2009 and last year planted 20,000 trees. The Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) partners with Copernicus Educational Products to support this program. NCC has provided expert advice on the type of seedlings to provide and Copernicus provides the seedlings. Elementary schools that want to participate should contact Copernicus.
Great Canadian Birdathon
This spring, the time you spend birding can help the very birds you're looking at. Join the Great Canadian Birdathon and conserve birds and biodiversity across Canada! It's so easy to participate. All you have to do is gather your sponsors and go birding on day in May. You can even donate a portion of the funds you raise to your local naturalist club. More information here.
Carolinian Canada Trip: Backus Woods/Long Point (Point Rowan)
Members Only, May 12 & 13
On May 12 we will explore Backus Woods, our best old growth Carolininan forest in Ontario. Backus Woods is owned and managed by the Nature Conservancy of Canada. This is a ramble for those interested in birds, flowers, trees, etc.
On May 13 we will explore Long Point Provincial Park. A biosphere reserve recognized by UNESCO, Long Point is 20 miles [32.2km] long and thought to be 4,000 years old. It's a staging area for migratory songbirds and waterfowl, and populated by birds, turtles, fish, reptiles, and amphibians.
Leader: Joanne Doucette. This is a 2.5 hour drive from Toronto. Car pooling. Camping or motel. Members only. Space is limited so reserve by April 25 by emailing or leaving a message at the TFN Office: 416-593-2656.